Categories
Nature Opinion

Guest opinion: Vicki Nichols Goldstein and Sophia Zengierski: Oceans’ issues affect us all


Corals on the East Coast might seem miles away, but Coloradans, like all Americans, have a stake in this decision. We are all dependent on the ocean, no matter where we live.

Full Story
Categories
Nature

Check Out Our Interactive Map!


Check Out Our Interactive Map!

 
Team Eden Crashers created the interactive map as part of their senior capstone experience.

Team Eden Crashers created the interactive map as part of their senior capstone experience.

We are excited to share our interactive map with the community! Please check out our Interactive Map page to explore more regarding the location, variety, and photos of many of the apples found in Boulder County.

Interactive Map
Historian Amelia Brackett Hogstad assists a student with field data collection.

Historian Amelia Brackett Hogstad assists a student with field data collection.

The Boulder Apple Tree Project is also happy to announce our exhibit with the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History is part of the Museum From Home experience. We will continue adding to the exhibit over the next few weeks so check it out often!

Museum From Home
Crabapple tree visited during the AppleBlitz 2018

Crabapple tree visited during the AppleBlitz 2018

Now that all of the local trees have leaves our thoughts are turning to collecting and measuring fruits. We want to thank all of our enthusiastic apple reporters and volunteers for continuing to let us know of trees that still need a visit. The first three weeks of August will see our summer community college Bridge students visiting tree locations and taking measurements. Please be on the look out for an email with our plans for measuring your trees with social distancing in mind.


 

Related posts

Categories
Nature

Mount Everest is Visible From Kathmandu, Nepal for First Time in Living Memory


Last week Mount Everest was visible from Kathmandu for the first time in living memory. The picture above, taken from Chobar by Abhushan Gautam, of the world’s highest peak over 120-miles away, would not have been possible two months ago, reports the Nepal Times. Source: Mount Everest is Visible From Kathmandu, Nepal for First Time […]

Full Story
Categories
Nature

The History Team: Where We Are Now


The History Team: Where We Are Now

 
The students of the CU History Department’s “Environmental History at Home,” celebrating the end of the semester.

The students of the CU History Department’s “Environmental History at Home,” celebrating the end of the semester.

We just wrapped up the semester in the BATP-affiliated undergraduate research course, “Environmental History at Home,” run out of the History Department at CU. Despite closed archives and virtual classrooms, the students stayed engaged to the end and turned in some inventive and fun final projects on Boulder’s environmental and apple history.

Right now, we are transitioning from a semester of teaching while planning our upcoming exhibit with the Natural History Museum at the University of Colorado, Boulder. As with most public projects at the moment, we are preparing for different options, including an in-person exhibit and a virtual one. Whatever happens, we are excited to continue the undergraduate work that has supported the History Team so far!

Looking ahead, there are some big possibilities for the History Team. We plan to integrate historical interpretation into our future community orchard and we hope to continue providing a platform for people to meet each other and gather around our common love of apples through community history events (anytime) and apple blitz interviews (in the fall).

We cannot do this work without your support. If you are interested in learning about apple history through your own archival research projects, conducting oral histories, or hosting a community history event in your neighborhood, please let us know by filling out our history volunteer form. We also welcome volunteers to help manage the History Team moving forward.

Finally, I want to thank everyone who has been a part of the history side of BATP over the past two years. I have learned so much from you, and the love of apples in this place has been a source of energy and excitement for me while I have been a part of the team. Though I am taking a backseat on the project now, I know there is much more to learn about and to create with the historic apple trees of Boulder County.

Amelia Brackett Hogstad

More on undergraduate history research at BATP here and here.

More on oral history and community engagement at BATP here and here.

 
Categories
Nature

Grafting Apple Trees


Grafting Apple Trees

 
Scion material from an apple tree cleft grafted to M111 root stock.

Scion material from an apple tree cleft grafted to M111 root stock.

I hope this new post finds you well and anticipating all of the planting that spring will bring. Since we are unable to graft as a group in person, I thought I would bring the grafting experience to you! Our step by step grafting protocol is used by the students and researchers working on the Project. Last year we grafted over 100 trees that were used by students in the Fall EBIO 1250 class. This week I was able to film a short demonstration of our grafting process as well. Please feel free to reach out to us if you have any questions regarding grafting!

This semester we had hoped to present another Apple Symposium but this time featuring the History students who are engaging in local research. Since the classes on campus have shifted to online-distance learning we have had to cancel the planned symposium. If you were unable to attend the first symposium in December, we have uploaded the videos of our speakers and panel to our Boulder Apple Tree Project YouTube channel. The first video contains opening remarks by Dr. Suding and a presentation from the Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project. The second video is the presentation by Dr. Gayle Volk of the USDA and our Panel Discussion. We hope you will find these presentations engaging and informative!

Donate today  

Related posts

Categories
Nature

Scientists discover first animal that doesn’t breathe oxygen


For the first time, scientists have discovered something they didn’t think existed — an animal that can’t breathe oxygen — and obviously doesn’t need to. Source: Scientists discover 1st animal that doesn’t breathe oxygen | CBC News 0

Full Story
Categories
Nature

History Symposium 2020 and Apple Tree Grafting


History Symposium 2020 and Apple Tree Grafting

Spring 2020 Apple Tree Symposium.png

We are happy to announce that we will be hosting the Boulder Apple Tree History Symposium in conjunction with the HIST 2326 class and the Museum of Natural History at CU on Sunday, April 26, from 1-4PM at the Henderson Building Paleontology Hall. This symposium will focus on the history of apples in Boulder County and will feature round-table discussions facilitated by the students enrolled in HIST 2326 this semester. Please register early for this free event (registration capped at 100). Parking fees do apply.

Register for Symposium Students grafting apple scion material onto root stock in 2017.

Students grafting apple scion material onto root stock in 2017.

We sill have space available for our Grafting Day on Saturday, March 28, from 9-noon, at the 30th Street Greenhouse. Please register as space is limited!

Register for Grafting Day

Related posts

Categories
Entertainment Nature

Pilobolus brings dreams to life


Contemporary dancers Pilobolus reimagine dance with fantastical imagery and impossible acrobatics. By Isabella Fincher
The post Pilobolus brings dreams to life appeared first on .

Full Story
Categories
Nature

Grafting with the Boulder Apple Tree Project!


Grafting with the Boulder Apple Tree Project!

  Irfan uses a safety jig made by Widespread Malus to safely prepare root stock for grafting.

Irfan uses a safety jig made by Widespread Malus to safely prepare root stock for grafting.

Have you ever wanted to learn how to graft an apple tree? Now is your chance! Join us on Saturday, March 28, 2020, between 9am and noon, at the 30th Street Greenhouse (1380 30th St, Boulder, CO 80301). Parking is very limited so we are asking folks to pre-register for a specific one-hour window. We are looking forward to helping you preserve your much loved trees!

 We will provide the root stock and you will provide the scions (grafting material)! The cost of the first graft is $25 (includes root stock, pot, tag, and care instructions) and each additional graft is $15. If you would like to further support the Apple Tree Project and our efforts to fund the orchard we will have canvas bags available for purchase at $15 each.

 Now is the time to select your scion material! Michigan State University has an excellent guide for selecting scion material to use in grafting. There are also copious videos available on YouTube.

 Here is the short version of what you need to know: collect the dormant material of last year’s new growth. In the photo below you will notice two sets of new growth circled in yellow. These will typically be growing perpendicular to the main branch from which they are growing. Using clean shears clip a portion that is about the size of a pencil that has several buds present. To keep the scion from drying out, please dip the end in a bit of candle wax or wrap with waxy tape and then place in a plastic bag or container with a damp paper towel.

 Once you have registered, we will send you a confirmation email. Thank you for your continued support of the Boulder Apple Tree Project!

Register Here!  

Related posts

The branch growth circled in yellow make great candidates for scion material for grafting.

The branch growth circled in yellow make great candidates for scion material for grafting.

Categories
Nature

Help support the development of the Boulder Apple Tree Project Orchard


Help support the development of the Boulder Apple Tree Project Orchard

  future_orchard.png

I feel so fortunate to be able to call Boulder and the Front Range my home. It is truly an amazing place – the people, communities, ecology. Yet, I am also shocked at times how fast this place is changing. Historic apple trees dot our neighborhoods, wildlands and parks. The Boulder Apple Tree Project is building ties among our history, community, and land via these amazing trees. 

 

February marks the third anniversary of the Apple Tree Project. We have accomplished so much in these years. We have recorded over 600 trees. We have analyzed the genetics of over 300 trees. We have found varieties that were commonly planted here in the late 1800s (like Ben Davis and Wealthy). We have found local varieties that were planted here in Boulder but possibly nowhere else. We have also stumbled upon wild seedlings, some of which might become a future Boulder variety able to withstand our harsh climate and with an amazing taste. We have involved over 50 students in our quest.

 

Building on this momentum, our next big step is to start preserving trees. The trees are reaching the ends of their lives. We lose some every year. So I write to you in hopes that you can help make our next step a reality. 

 

February and March is the time of year for grafting – taking twigs of trees we want to save and joining them to new young rootstock – essentially giving these trees a new life. We want to graft as many trees as we can to ensure their future vitality, but we are slowed because we don’t have a place to plant these trees once they are ready to be put in the ground.

 

Our dream is to be able to graft these special trees and plant them in community teaching orchards. Landscape architects at CU have designed the first one of these to be right in Boulder, off 30th street and the Boulder Creek Path, open to anyone that wants to walk under these great trees, eat their fruit, and learn their sorties. 

 

For this project to go forward, we are seeking funds for constructing the orchard, with the goal of ground breaking this summer.  By contributing to the project, you will become an instrumental partner with the Boulder Apple Tree Project in providing much needed community orchard that showcases history, food, and our special place.

 

Please consider joining with other individuals and community organizations to help us put this next step into full swing and reach our fundraising goal of $25,000 by March 30th, 2020.  You can donate online by following the link below or on the Boulder Apple Tree Project webpage. 

 

Warmly, 

 

Katharine Suding

The Boulder Apple Tree Project

University of Colorado Boulder

P.S. We have lots of upcoming exciting events, please see our web page on how to join in!

 

March 28, 2020 Learn How to Graft with the Boulder Apple Tree Project

April 25, 2020 Apple Tree Planting with the Growe Foundation

April 26, 2020 Boulder Apple Tree Project History Symposium

August 17, 2020 Apple Tree Project exhibit opening at the CU Museum of Natural History 

Donate to the Orchard  

Related posts